The Future of Mobile Phones – 6PR interview

6pr-mobile-phone-round
In his regular radio segment Tod and Morris discuss the future of mobile phones, who will have them, what they’ll do and where we’ll use them. Recorded live 28 February 2009


The What, Why, Wow and So What of Business Social Media – the introductory workshop

This workshop really is by popular demand!

social marketing brochure Feb 09 Ver 1.0

Are you overwhelmed by all the social marketing blah blah and hype, don’t worry you’re not alone.

In the 80’s it was fax machine and mobile phones, in the 90’s internet and email and this decade it’s been on-line search and web 2.0 and we’ve learnt to conquer and use all of these, social media will be no different.

The reality is that social networking and social media are set to become tomorrow’s big “everyday business tool” and whether you like it or not, want it or not, it’s here to stay and grow. What you need to do is stop complaining about it and start learning about it, figure out what it is, how it effects you and what you need to do to make it work hard for you.

This discussion is so much bigger than search engine optimisation (SEO), websites, FaceBook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter or the myriad of other websites we’re constantly
being bombarded with and although they’re important, they’re only the tip of the iceberg of what you need to know and do.

This one day, hands on, extremely practical insider’s tour is just what you need to make sense of what’s happening on-line and learn how you can harness it to improve your bottom and top line.

Morris Miselowski, recently named by Australia Post as “one of the world’s leading futurists”, is a hands on business futurist and strategist working globally as well as in
demand professional speaker and media commentator. He will personally escort you on this one day virtual on-line insiders tour and show you the world of the not too distant business future, and explain on-line social media and networking, how to make sense of it, how to use it in your business before your competitors do and most importantly how to make money from it – today.

Download the full brochure here

3AW’s Denis Walter and Morris Miselowski discuss the future of Mobile Phones – Part 1

mobile-phones-3aw
In this weeks regular 3AW radio segment, Morris and Dennis Walter, discuss the future of mobile phones, why 21.3 million Australian need 22.6 mobile phones, what mobile phones will be used for in the future and take listeners calls.

50 WAYS TO FOSTER A SUSTAINABLE CULTURE OF INNOVATION

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1. Remember that innovation requires no fixed rules or templates — only guiding principles. Creating a more innovative culture is an organic and creative act.

2. Wherever you can, whenever you can, always drive fear out of the workplace. Fear is “Public Enemy #1” of an innovative culture.

3. Have more fun. If you’re not having fun (or at least enjoying the process) something is off.

4. Always question authority, especially the authority of your own longstanding beliefs.

5. Make new mistakes.

6. As far as the future is concerned, don’t speculate on what might happen, but imagine what you can make happen.

7. Increase the visual stimuli of your organization’s physical space. Replace gray and white walls with color. Add inspiring photos and art, especially visuals that inspire people to think differently. Reconfigure space whenever possible.

8. Help people broaden their perspective by creating diverse teams and rotating employees into new projects — especially ones they are fascinated by.

9. Ask questions about everything. After asking questions, ask different questions. After asking different questions, ask them in a different way.

10. Ensure a high level of personal freedom and trust. Provide more time for people to pursue new ideas and innovations.

11. Encourage everyone to communicate. Provide user-friendly systems to make this happen.

12. Instead of seeing creativity training as a way to pour knowledge into people’s heads, see it as a way to grind new glasses for people so they can see the world in a different way.

13. Learn to tolerate ambiguity and cope with soft data. It is impossible to get all the facts about anything. “Not everything that counts can be counted. Not everything that can be counted counts,” said Einstein.

14. Embrace and celebrate failure. 50 to 70 per cent of all new product innovations fail at even the most successful companies. The main difference between companies who succeed at innovation and those who don’t isn’t their rate of success — it’s the fact that successful companies have a LOT of ideas, pilots, and product innovations in the pipeline.

15. Notice innovation efforts. Nurture them wherever they crop up. Reward them.

16. When you’re promoting innovation in-house, always promote the benefits of a new idea or project, not the features.

17. Don’t focus so much on taking risks, per se, but on taking the risks OUT of big and bold ideas.

18. Encourage people to get out of their offices and silos. Encourage people to meet informally, one-on-one, and in small groups.

19. Think long term. Since the average successful “spin-off” takes about 7.5 years, the commitment to innovation initiatives need to be well beyond “next quarter.”

20. Create a portfolio of opportunities: short-term, long-term, incremental, and discontinuous. Just like an investment portfolio, balance is critical.

21. Involve as many people as you can in the development of your innovation initiative so you get upfront buy-in. This is the “go-slow now to go-fast later” approach. (The opposite approach of having a few people go off to a desert island and come back with their concept is almost always doomed to failure).

22. Improve the way brainstorming sessions and meetings are facilitated in your organization. Create higher standards and practices.

23. Make sure people are working on the right issues. Identify specific business challenges to focus on. Be able to frame these issues as questions that start with the words, “How can we?”

24. Communicate, communicate, communicate, communicate, communicate and then communicate again. Deliver each important message at least six times.

25. Select and install idea management software for your intranet.

26. Don’t focus on growth. Growth is a product of successful innovation. Focus on the process of becoming adept at taking ideas from the generation stage to the marketplace.

27. Make customers your innovation partners, while realizing that customers are often limited to incremental innovations, not breakthrough ones.

28. Understand that the best innovations are initiated by individuals acting on their own at the periphery of your organization. Don’t make your innovation processes so rigid that they get in the way of informal and spontaneous innovation efforts. Build flexibility into your design. Think “self-organizing” innovation, not “command and control” innovation.

29. Find new ways to capture learnings throughout your organization and new ways to share these learnings with everyone. Use real-life stories to transfer the learnings.

30. Stimulate interaction between segments of the company that traditionally don’t connect or collaborate with each other.

31. Develop a process of trying out new concepts quickly and on the cheap. Learn quickly what’s working and what’s not.

32. Avoid analysis paralysis. Chaotic action is preferable to orderly inaction.

33. Before reaching closure on any course of action, seek alternatives. Make it a discipline to seek the idea after the “best” idea emerges.

34. Know that attacking costs as a root problem solves nothing. Unreasonable costs are almost always a sign of more profound problems (e.g. inefficient structures, processes or training).

35. A great source of new ideas are people that are new to the company. Get new hires together and tap their brainpower and imagination.

36. Get customer feedback before committing resources to a product’s development.

37. Seek diversity of viewpoints. Get people together across functions. A diversity of views sparks more than conflict — it sparks innovation.

38. Invite outside partners early on when exploring new opportunities. Find ways for your company to partner with others and actively share ideas, technologies, and other capabilities.

39. Avoid extreme time pressures.

40. Don’t make the centre of your efforts to help people be more creative a physical “creativity center.” Fold your innovation resources into your business units.

41. Don’t make innovation the responsibility of a few. Make innovation the responsibility of each and every employee with performance goals for each and every functional area.

42. Give your people specific, compelling, and measurable innovation goals.

43. Try to get as much buy-in and support from senior leadership as you can while realizing that true change NEVER starts at the top. How often does the revolution start with the King?

44. Realize that “resource allocation” is the last bastion of Soviet-style central planning. Think of new innovation opportunities as “resource attractors.”

45. Pay particular attention to alignment. Ensure that the interests and actions of all employees are directed toward key company goals, so that any employee will recognize and respond positively to a potentially useful idea.

46. Reward collective, not only individual successes, but also maintain clear individual accountabilities and keep innovation heroes visible.

47. Do your best to ensure that linear processes give way to networks of collaboration.

48. Remove whatever organizational obstacles are in the way of people communicating bold, new ideas to top management.

49. Systematize. Find problems (not only with products, but with processes, customer service, and business models) and solve them.

50. Drive authority downwards. Make decisions quickly at the lowest level possible.

 

article source http://www.ideachampions.com/weblogs/archives/2009/02/50_ways_to_fost_1.shtml