What lies ahead in mining’s future? | Australian Mining

What-lies-ahead-in-minings-future-blog-655553-l_300Morris Miselowski is a world renowned Business Futurist based in Melbourne, Australia. For three decades he has provided practical and profitable foresight to Corporations, CEOs, and key decision makers around the globe. He is also a highly sought after conference keynote presenter and media commentator on all things “future.”

(Ventyx): What will a miner’s job look like in 20-50 years?

Morris Miselowski: The mining industry is on a precipice of exciting change. In 50 years we will still be mining, but a technology boom in robots, drones, driverless trucks and pilotless trains will begin to reshape the industry and create mines of the future.

Looking forward technology, machinery and robots will routinely be doing the grunt and repetitious work whilst miners attend to the higher order thinking and wisdom tasks. The future mining work environment will see a skeleton on-site workforce collaborating with external specialists and supervisory staff working precisely out of remote operation centres.

What skills will mining and energy workers need in 20-50 years that they don’t have today?

The future of the mining industry is characterised in all aspects of its business, with an increased focus on improving its people and workforce and employing new techniques in developing insight, knowledge and working remotely.

Mining and Energy workers will continue to evolve their specialist skill sets and their job and task descriptions of 2014, 2024 and 2054 will show little resemblance to its predecessor, in line with the broader industry trajectory that 60% of the tasks we’ll be doing in 2025 have not yet been thought of.

There will always be a need for hands on, physical work in mining and the country the mine is located in will continue to dictate the appropriate balance and use of human capital versus technology.

Increasingly mines, miners and energy workers will use technology to assist them with their roles. These will range from evolved on-site tools and equipment, fully and semi-autonomous robots, increasing use of Artificial Intelligence, 3 and 4D printers and a growing trend for technology that allows for remote management and work.

Miners’ workers in the next few years will be using big data, analytics and real time information to guide and inform their work. Their clothes, tools and surroundings will all contain technology, each specific to a data collection task, but collectively amassing information on the miner and the mines conditions, work completed and to be completed and the mine surroundings and adjusting work conditions and tasks accordingly.

The next few decades will bring with it the necessity to simultaneously prove and improve current and prospective new energy technologies, whilst seeking out and innovating new energy sources and although many of today’s core Energy worker’s skills will continue to be useful into the next few decades, the backdrop and work environment in which they use them will change.

Innovation of new energy sources and practices will bring with it a need to ensure all workers have heightened Collaborative, Communication and Creative Problem Solving skills with which to approach each new challenge, where the solutions are not obvious, rarely based on past experiences and require a united force of disparate individuals, corporations and Governments to resolve.

Where will our power come from in 20-50 years?

An increase in the world’s population coupled with climate change, technological innovations and higher living standards will have a significant impact on how we live our lives. As a result, there’s likely to be more changes to the way energy is sourced, supplied and used.

The IEA (International Energy Agency) states that it would cost the world $44 trillion to wean itself off fossil fuels by 2050, given this and current projections that we will have sufficient oil reserves for the next 50 years and with evolving technologies allowing us to profitably mine deeper and in harsher conditions and in more remote and obscure places, the likelihood is that we will extend our reserves well beyond 50 years.

Despite this, there is a strong global societal demand for us to change fuels and to work towards an increasingly distributed energy future rather than a centralised energy system that exists today.

Future energy sources will include making better, cleaner use of existing non-renewable energy sources including petrol, diesel, coal, LNG and gas, whilst simultaneously evolving the use of renewables such as solar, hydrogen, thermal, tidal and wind.

We will continue to innovate and seek out alternate energy sources with the likelihood that alternate energy will be found, but the reality of these is the lag in exploration, acceptance and commercialization, currently renewable energy only accounts for 2.7% of total global energy use and although this is up 8% from 10 years ago (source: BP) and will continue to rise in the decades ahead, we still have a very long way to go.

Where and what will we be mining in 20-50 years?

An increase in population and wealth will generate a higher dependency on resources meaning many of today’s existing mines will continue to produce into the next few decades allowing mines to prosper.

With an increase in the convergence of biotech, nanotech and IT we will see previously abandoned mines come back on stream and making once inaccessible and unprofitable mines profitable.

Technology will continue to evolve exponentially in the mining and energy sectors and will bring with it the ability to extract more from less and to profitably go deeper, wetter and further than we have ever been able to before.

These new technologies and practices they will bring will take what we know and extend on it, but will also offer us new and presently unheard of innovation which may include what may now seem incredulous practices like using various bacteria’s and mechanical microbots to get into places and reduce cost of recovery and also to transmute material concentrating resource reserves into more economical extractions.

There is also a lot of hype around Asteroid mining as a possible future exploration zone, but given the cost of returning the materials to earth I believe this will be some way off before becoming a viable proposition. It is more probable in the medium term that any mining done in space, will be used in space for space station, tourism and other construction needs.
How will technology change the way we interact with each other?

By 2050 we will have added 3 billion people to our planet, each living longer, consuming more and looking for more. This growing middle class appetite for goods and services will drive a continued demand for resources and ensure the need for mining for at least the next fifty years.

source

Life on Demand | Sky Business TV

me_on_switzerThe red cordial high we used to get from new tech, gadgets and gizmos is over.

We know that tech, the internet and the digital world is in our pockets, briefcases, handbags, in the things we wear and carry, but we’re over it all we really want now is perspective and purpose.

I’ve watched with interest as my geek and nerd mates have come out of tech hibernation ready to use, not enthuse, and its great to find that Microsoft’s latest whitepaper “Life on Demand” shows empirical evidence of this and what’s even better is that I get to put my two cents in on the findings and implications ahead for the way we’ll work, play and live in the future. so Microsoft’s Steven Miller, Vivid Idea’s Director and TEDx Sydney Curator Jess Scully and I headed into the TV studio to chat with Peter Switzer on Sky Business Channel about Life on Demand and where we’re headed.

Watch the segment now and then share your thoughts on Life on Demand.

Back on Switzer tonight with the Microsoft #LifeOnDemand crew

me_and_switzer_8_April_14On Sky Business TV tonight with @PeterSwitzer @ 7.30 to discuss the #FutureOfWork with the Microsoft team around their #lifeondemand white paper, tune in and see where the brave new world of work, life and stuff is headed.

The Australian Workplace of The Future Is Here and It’s a Bit Blurry | Mashable

escapecubicleI have an addiction and I’m proud of it. It’s a constant need to check what’s happening on Mashable. So to be quoted in a Mashable article, is a moment to pause and give thanks. Anyway enough of that here’s the story…

SYDNEY — Entrepreneurs have been loving their new working lives for years, while regular office workers kept on slaving away in a cubicle. The good news is here. “Nine to five” is on the way out, finally.

Last week, Microsoft released ‘Life on Demand’, a white paper which looked into the digital habits of 1027 Australians aged 18 – 65 in collaboration with global research firm Ipsos. It revealed Australians are working around the clock due to higher connectivity than ever before, signaling a change in workplace culture with blurred lines between work and play.

The report shows 93% of Australians are now connected and spend an average of 17.5 hours online a week. In a shock show of dedication, 39% of millennials are also happy to be contacted by their employer 24/7. It comes with a caveat though; they also want to be able to entertain themselves with shopping, social media and videos while in the workplace.

Microsoft-Infogaphic-pg18

The data indicates a blurring of boundaries between work-life and home-life, which signals a new phase of employment. Work and play are now interchangeable in an employee’s day, with 53% of Australians completing personal tasks at work while 44% do work activities outside the traditional working hours.

“Our technology has become a constant extension 
of us, wherever we are — a complete departure 
from the way we lived life as little as five years ago,” the report stated. “Social context and location no longer determine what we do.”

“We are witnessing the beginning of the end of rigid divisions between ‘work’ & ‘play,’ and ‘work’ & ‘personal,’ as we have known them for the last 150 years. It’s happened so quickly, seamlessly and ‘naturally’ that it’s difficult to remember what life was like before,” the report continued.

Business futurist Morris Miselowski, who helped launch the paper in Sydney, spoke to Mashable about how he sees the workplace advancing and the quiet revolution so many people have missed while looking down at their device.

Miselowski agrees we are coming out of the way the workplace has worked since the industrial revolution, where the common belief was many hands make light work and the means of production were centralised. Technology has shifted the nature of work, due to the fact we can work from anywhere at anytime and Australians are embracing this change, yet employers need to keep up.
He sees a workplace bringing in skill sets when they are necessary, rather than having a person on staff “just in case”. In the next five years, Morris predicts we will see the move towards a disappearance of a physical space and the introduction of a highly “fluid” work schedule.

“In the next ten years, 60% of the tasks we will be doing we can’t even label today. The landscape isn’t clear like before,” Miselowski said. “Today’s kids, who are finishing education, are going to have six careers and 14 jobs. They will have a lifespan of 150 years and work until they are 90 years old. It will be a far more fluid workspace than now.”

So is there a possibility everyone will burn out in a few years time? With the “red cordial” phase of the past few years coming to an end, Miselowski believes a “burn out” phase would only eventuate if the consumer allows it.

The red cordial analogy refers to the hyper-active phase of consumption we have seen over the past five years, where the never-ending stream of content created a life dominated by multi-tasking. This mentality and excitement at the access to information took precedence over a deeper understanding of how to consume the appropriate information at the appropriate time.

“After an intensely rapid period of adoption of devices we’re entering a more reflective phase. We need devices and services that give the flexibility to move from one part of our life to the next, but we’re also learning how to adapt to this new way of living and negotiate some ‘tech-etiquette’ around the role of technology in our lives,” the report said.

It shows millennials are already aware of their need for time-out periods from technology, and are beginning to master technology to work for them rather than against them.

“If you allow it, technology can follow us into every corner of our lives,” Miselowski said. “But I have really seen that diminish over the past few years. We are not locked in a room [with technology], we can turn it off. We need to learn to master technology. You can use it all day or you can put it down and just step away.”

In the report, the consumers (18 – 35 year olds) accused of using technology to excess are actually the users who have learned to turn it off, demand a change to etiquette and command balance in their lives. The research showed one in five people in this age group have time-out breaks from technology or meditate away from devices. One in two people admit they take a power nap to recharge for the rest of the day and seven in ten Australians surveyed exercise weekly.
Microsoft-Infogaphic-pg21
In the next decade, Miselowski said the peak-hour commute would begin to fade away as employers realise face-time does not necessarily equal productivity and as the standard nine-to-five hours blur. The employers that will gain the most success from the workplace of the future are ones that “understand that innovation is at the core of what we do”.

“Companies that are willing to be collaborative, creative, understand employees and work in a flexible nature, while constantly questioning the market place and their offering” will dominate in the next decade, Miselowski said.

officespace
Employers will begin to realise face time will means nothing.

As people work and live how they want and have a “just in time” mentality –- which can be seen through the success of apps such as Uber — businesses will need to adapt and grow in the same way or be left behind.

With technology comes globalisation and Managing Director of Telsyte, Foad Fadaghi, believes being so connected helps his every day business activities.

“I can work with people in say, San Francisco, anytime, it’s so seamless. Technology is allowing us to be everywhere at once, no matter what time of day it is here or in another country or where we happen to be,” he said in the report.

“Once only multinationals could collaborate on a global scale for business like this. Now any kid with a device can connect with other people around the world to share ideas and create new things. The implications for how we do business and innovation are huge.”

source

for a copy of the report:MicrosoftReport-29 7 14

Technology in the new Call of Duty is your terrifying new reality | The Vine

284352Technology might be evolving at a crazy pace, but it’s nowhere as far-flung as it is in video games, right? I mean, science fiction isn’t about to punch us square in the face. Playing games like Deus Ex: Human Revolution, Hawken, Mechwarrior or the newest Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare, one might seek solace in the fact that, hey, at least we don’t have mech suits and invisibility cloaks stalking our battlefields today.

This, sadly, isn’t the case.

I sat down and chatted with Morris Miseloewski, noted business futurist, about the shrinking gap between tech in games, and tech in real life.

TheVine: Morris, the first thing that struck me upon watching the trailer for Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare was the exoskeletons, and how similar they look to those worn by Tom Cruise and Emily Blunt in The Edge of Tomorrow. Which is, frankly, science fiction. How far off are we, realistically, from having that kind of tech out there in the real world?

Morris Miseloewski: How ’bout last week? I mean, a lot of that tech is actually on prototype stage at the moment, and is being tested… we’re not going to see it mainstream for maybe five years, maybe more, but let’s take some of the tech seen in Advanced Warfare and have a look at it. So first, we know drones are out and about, so drones at the moment are being used for all kinds of surveillance, for police use, the army… everyone uses them, and they started off just doing surveillance. But they now do tracking, and are also able to deliver things onto the battlefield, and they can also… well, they can shoot. So drone technology is very much here, and is getting better and better. But one of my favourites is the exoskeleton, which is basically a suit of body armor you put on. And that actually exists! You can actually buy one in Japan, but it isn’t used for warfare, it’s used for aged care.

Right! God, that’s eerie. There’s an anime from back in the early nineties called Roujin Z, it’s literally about that; robotic exoskeletons that care for old people. Of course, it’s anime, so the suits malfunction and go on a rampage, but otherwise, oddly prescient.

Hah! So this isn’t exactly like that, I mean, maybe they’ll get around to it. But what they have in Japan is for the carers of the old people, so the nursing staff, to help them pick up and move around the elderly, getting them in and out of wheelchairs. So this previously fantastic, unbelievable technology is now in the real world, providing the extra strength needed for carers.

There’s also quite a lot of work being done using exoskeletons to help quadriplegics and paraplegics, for the same purposes. When you talk to a futurist, and they deal with tomorrow, not today… there’s actual work being done at the moment, not just talk. Many scientists and doctors believe that this tech won’t be a panacea for everybody, but some will benefit greatly from this. And in the field of war, as seen in Advanced Warfare, there are absolutely prototypes out there. The actual mechanics we view as far fetched are out there, being used, they’re not pie in the sky.

How about some of the other tech you mentioned?

My favourite is actually invisibility cloak tech, that lets you disappear. And that exists, too, and has actually been around a little while. The fighter planes you see that are basically big, grey triangles? They can actually have cloaking on them, they disappear from radar. And there’s tech out there that Mercedes Benz tried as a stunt, but the army is trying to develop seriously; they can turn vehicles invisible, by bending or fracturing light. The eye can’t see them, nor can telescopes or what have you. But that stuff’s here, too, and there’s evidence of it being used.

Well, look… there’s no easy way to phrase this, but does this tech make war… better? By which I mean more efficient, because obviously, war is abhorrent.

It’s changed the battlefield dramatically. We’re not better off, you’re right, but what’s changed is that it used to take thousands to do what it now takes one person, and the ability to be precise. That’s the biggest difference. We’re in the midst right now of celebrating… well, commemorating, World War One. And we’re talking about hundreds of thousands of people going to battle. Those were the numbers we talked about, and coped with.
Now, we have such precision, wielded by people who don’t even necessarily need to be in the mix, they’re miles away operating drones. The first person shooter experience is, in many ways, becoming closer to what war will be like soon. The individual has far more control, more manipulation, and more tech on and with them that we didn’t have before. Good, bad… that’s up to the individual, but the nature of war itself is certainly changing, and it’s becoming more like games all the time. And that’s because of technology, certainly.

So how does this affect you, as a futurist?
Much of my job is trying to describe to people things that don’t exist… yet. And what games like Advanced Warfare do, is they take tech that is out there in a very rarefied, inaccessible prototype stage, and lets you… well, not physically touch it, but interact with it digitally. So people are getting an idea of these incredible things, which in turn informs how they’ll be developed as mainstream down the line. In games, or fiction, is evidence of what we might have, what might come about tomorrow. Today, because of games, you can actually get in there amongst virtual versions of what will come.

Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare is out this November.
Paul Verhoeven (@paulverhoeven)

source

Call of Duty: A Futurist on the Future of Warfare | IGN

Talking the present and future of invisibility cloaks, smart guns, exoskeletons and private military companies. By Nathan Lawrence

We’ve already taken a comedic dig at the possibilities for Call of Duty beyond the futuristic setting of Advanced Warfare, but while some of those tongue-in-cheek predictions may turn out to be on the money, what is clear is that Advanced Warfare takes the future of warfare seriously. As is claimed in the initial marketing for Advanced Warfare, Sledgehammer Games has spent some quality time with futurists: experts whose job it is to accurately hypothesise about the kind of technological realities that will exist beyond the horizon.

To further push the point, Activision put us in touch with Australian futurist Morris Miselowski to provide some context for the technology and ideas being showcased in Advanced Warfare, and what we can expect beyond.

IGN: How exactly does someone become a futurist?

Morris: There are two parts to this one. There is an academic part to it, and that goes right through to postgraduate and doctorate. You receive a qualification in what’s called foresight – that’s the legal academia word for it – then go on to do whatever you want to do. I come from a business-strategy viewpoint, and that’s where my qualification and experience are, and I’ve done it for 33 years. I also lectured through postgrad in that area, and my speciality was always foresight, and the business-futurist angle was part of that. Believe it or not, there’s actually structure and science to this.

IGN: Don’t futurists just watch a whole lot of sci-fi films and use that to predict what’s coming next?

Morris: No, that’s [sci-fi films] actually what made me want to do it. I’m a baby boomer, so when I grew up and was watching things like Star Trek, I didn’t know I wanted to be a futurist, but I was always besotted by what was going to happen in the future. With business strategy, my clients always wanted to understand what tomorrow looked like so that we could build accordingly, and I found that I was less interested in the theory of what business strategy was, and it was more a conversation about what was likely to occur over the horizon so we could position ourselves appropriately…

As a futurist, I work for a tonne of clients across the globe trying to understand for them what the world of tomorrow might look like so they can make best decisions, best resourcing and best thinking around how they want to meet those demands and, for me, most of my skill set – apart from knowing that stuff – is really allowing people to imagine that space, because you have to buy into the dream if you’re going to move your company or your thinking in that direction. I use a lot of storytelling, a lot of imagination, a lot of evidentiary experience, because I’ve really got to move you beyond what’s known, because if it’s known, it’s not futurism.

Most of the warfare, most of the craft, most of the thinking, in CoD [Advanced Warfare] is actually embedded in pure futurism, and these are things that I know to be true… as in prototype, as in thinking, as in practice, as in methodology. So to actually see it virtually, and to be able to experience it before it happens in real life, for me, it’s just life on toast: it’s wonderful. I know these things are going to be a part of our world and I don’t have to wait until they actually are.

IGN: Is there an element where you and other futurists are inspiring these technologies because, if it doesn’t exist, and you’re saying that you have to get your clients to buy into the idea that it will exist, does that mean futurists help push people towards technology that might not otherwise happen?

Morris: If I had that much influence on the world, we’d all be a bad place. The answer is that I do tell my clients… that the future doesn’t exist: there’s nothing about it that is written with certainty. It’s up to people to decide what elements of it they want and to champion those, and then to move towards creating them. So I would use the word ‘provoke’. I’d like to think that I provoke people to think about whether these things are a part of their future, and if they are, then to commit towards building or assembling or whatever’s appropriate for that piece of that activity towards making it real.

Morris: Oh, yeah… a lot of the things that we’re describing here are what I’d call routine. In other words, they are things that we can do repeatedly, it’s well known what needs to be done and they’re in a sequence. Most of that is going over to technology. So, like drones, like our invisibility cloak, like the ability to fire, all of those things about precision, they can be handed over to a robot or some kind of mechanised activity quite easily. Where soldiers will play a part, and this is really the first shooter experience that you and I had in a CoD game, is that we get to control it. We get what I call the wisdom. So, really, as a player in this game, you have the wisdom to control all of these technologies in the level that you think would make it appropriate for this battle, and that’s the role that people have in war and also in life, moving forward, is to use all of these technologies and to figure out how to use them best, and when’s appropriate, and which ones.

These things, to me, are tools the same way a hammer or a screwdriver is: they’re very sophisticated, and they alleviate a lot of the hard grunt work, but they’re always used in the hands of people. Even when we’re talking about remote which, again, you can see in the game, operates at huge distances. We can fire something and it hits 1,000 kilometres away. It’s still people making that decision that that’s what we should do and then using technology to do it, which is that firsthand experience that we have as the shooter or as the player.

IGN: What type of things are we going to see beyond the technology of Advanced Warfare? Are we going to be seeing lightsabers, laser rifles and space battles in the next iteration of warfare, or is that still way, way off?

Morris: I don’t know about laser battles. We probably will, but there’s lots of stuff on the horizon that we don’t yet know about. We’ve got what are called smart guns. Now, smart guns are guns that know who the shooter is, so it will only work in your hands. You can attach smart bullets, and that will make sure that the bullet doesn’t actually come back to shoot the shooter. So, in other words, if you dropped the gun, nobody else could pick it up and use it… So we’ve got those kinds of technologies. We’ve also got underpinning it, the notion of the PMC, the private military company, and that’s kind of like what the game is built on, this notion that warfare has not been handed over, but is now a private corporation, and that’s something that we’re going to see in warfare. We’re already doing it. I think we’re going to see more and more of it as we move through the decades. What was once a government activity is now also possibly a private activity.

IGN: PMCs seem like such a Hollywood concept.

Morris: Yeah, but they’ve been around for, honestly, 30 or 40 years. They just haven’t been well known, and they’re becoming more and more prominent, as are most things where the government has decided it doesn’t play a part, or shouldn’t play a part anymore. So a government will still engage in war if they think it’s relevant, they’ll still take the battle on, but they will often bring outsourced expertise in, and that’s what you get to play in this game.“

A government will still engage in war if they think it’s relevant, they’ll still take the battle on, but they will often bring outsourced expertise in, and that’s what you get to play in this game.

What you have, I mean, you’re part of this PMC, and what you have is best thinking, best people, best technology, because the argument is the government, with the best of intentions, can’t upgrade their technology very often. They can’t really train their people easily and quickly, they can’t deploy them easily and quickly, whereas a private company, by the nature of it, it makes a profit by making sure that people are well trained, up to date, have the latest technology, are very clear and precise about what their targets are and about what they need to do, and can move quite quickly. That’s why governments like PMCs because they can achieve all those things, where a government is slow and cumbersome.

So in the game, you actually get to be part of the experience of a PMC: somebody who is agile, somebody who has the latest technology. All these things which are part of modern warfare and will be into the future are really just there for us to play with.

IGN: How far ahead into the future can a futurist safely predict things with a decent sense of accuracy?

Morris: The answer is I can’t predict what’s going to happen in the next two minutes. I’m careful about that because all I talk about is hypothesising. I can’t force everyone to have my will, but I can hypothesise the things that are more likely. Now, the furthest that I’m working at the moment is 2060, so some of my projects are really thinking into 2060, around whatever that particular issue is. I’ve done this for 33 years, you can track me back for about 15 years online through my blog and other things, and I’m fairly accurate: I’m up around 90 percent plus. I’m really careful and deliberate about the things that I speak about; I do not make wild accusations or comments. I’m careful and deliberate, but I’m also very much provocative. I don’t just take safe steps. If you talk to most of my clients I talk about outlandish things that they think are incredible, but with the space of time, they can turn out to be quite ordinary. But it’s all about hypothesising, for me, and I know I’m being semantic about the word, but I’m always careful that people understand that I’m not forcing my will on them, I’m just forcing my opinion on them.

They can then use that and, again, that’s what this game has done. It’s used a whole lot of futurists, a whole lot of other people and, together, collectively, looked at what’s ahead. Part of what I think is going to come from this game, which is my science fiction, is everyone that plays it will decide if they like various elements and, without knowing it, they’ll go into the future and create the things they like, because that’s what happened with science fiction. We liked things in the movies we saw and the books we read, in the cartoons we saw, and then, as individuals, we took elements out of it and said, ‘It doesn’t exist. Why doesn’t it? How do I make it exist?’ And we went ahead and created it. It’s just phenomenal. I did a piece about a year ago about the 10 technologies that came out of Star Trek, and they were things that we never thought would happen but have all become real because baby boomers like me saw it and said, ‘You know what? I’m going to make it happen.’ That’s what you get to do with this game, you get to play first-hand, see it, if you love it and think it should be a part of our world, then some of the people that play it will actually be the innovators and inventors of it.

If you plan on inventing something from Advanced Warfare, readers, please push for the personal invisibility cloak so we can add it to our futuristic Predator cosplay.

IGN: Advanced Warfare has exoskeletons, invisibility cloaks and more miniaturised drone technology than what we’re used to seeing; what kind of tangible touchstones do you have as a futurist to be able to predict that these things are going to be part of future warfare?

Morris: They exist already. I must say, exoskeletons and drones are the two things that drew me to the game because I talk about those a lot. Exoskeletons actually exist and have existed for about five, maybe 10 years, but not in the way they’re used in the game, yet.

Exoskeletons actually exist and have existed for about five, maybe 10 years, but not in the way they’re used in the game, yet.

Most of the work around exoskeletons is in Japan, and it’s being used around aged care. My first understanding of exoskeletons was actually around working around the future of health and wellness, and it was finding exoskeletons for my aged-care clients. What they’re used for in Japan is for carers who wear them to be able to lift patients around. Traditionally, it takes at least two carers to move a non-ambulatory patient – someone who can’t move themselves – into a shower, out of the bed, into a wheelchair, or wherever. And Japan has a difficult issue and that is they have a huge number of aged people and very few carers. They’re an ageing society.

The other thing Japan does really well is to embrace technology for solutions… Exoskeletons are still being used very much in aged care, I then saw… a prototype of it being used by military for the purpose of, again, adding strength to an individual who was in a war situation, and add agility to them, as well, so they were able to carry more, do more, move more, and basically just extend their physical body beyond its normal means. Exoskeletons are here already. You can buy the suit. They’re talking about exoskeletons being used by quadriplegics and paraplegics in the future. Now this does not mean that everybody with that disability will be able to use them, because it will depend on the individual circumstance, but there’s definite work being done for some to take advantage of [these] things.

IGN: What about things like the invisibility cloaks? Is that something that we’re seeing today?

Morris: Absolutely. What an invisibility cloak is, it’s not like science-fiction where it actually disappears, what they’re doing is creating a light field around the objects that then bends the light and causes the eye to not see that object. This has been around for a little while. The cloaking has been trialled on tanks and other things and, again, I saw that about five years ago.
Again, what CoD’s done with most of the things I’ve seen in this game is they’ve gone to a bunch of futurists, they’ve gone to a bunch of people that know about war craft and warfare in the future, they’ve gone to some technology providers and innovators, and they’ve rummaged around their closets and said, ‘What are you doing today that most people don’t know about that is likely to come about?’ And invisibility is absolutely on the horizon, I mean, chapter and verse kind of stuff is being done on it.

One of the ones I love in the game is they have something called the magnetic slingshot. You will have seen at some stage some superhero, and she or he will put their hands up in the air and… it’s like a gush of wind… and the people in front of them fell away. That’s actually something that we have now, and that’s using magnetics. It’s called a magnetic slingshot. What we’re able to do, again, is to project the magnetic field ahead of us, and the magnetic field does the same thing that you’ve seen in sci-fi: pushes people in that direction. It seems like science fiction, it seems like something I would say, or my workmates would say, but we really are in a space where we’re not far away from making that a reality, because in prototype it works.

IGN: Are you talking about throwing people off their feet with the Force, or is it just pushing you back in the sense that someone’s moving you backwards?

Morris: Both. It depends on the power that you use for that. We’re talking about not physically contacting somebody, but with this force, pushing them back or pushing them over. What we would be able to do in a war situation, which is what you can do in this game… you can push them back away from you without having to make physical contact. So that’s something that seems science fictiony but, in the game, it’s been researched and put in, because there’s lots of evidence that we will do that because we can do that.

IGN: It sounds like warfare is almost moving to more of an automated thing. Do you think that humans will have a place as soldiers in the future of warfare?

Morris: Oh, yeah… a lot of the things that we’re describing here are what I’d call routine. In other words, they are things that we can do repeatedly, it’s well known what needs to be done and they’re in a sequence. Most of that is going over to technology. So, like drones, like our invisibility cloak, like the ability to fire, all of those things about precision, they can be handed over to a robot or some kind of mechanised activity quite easily. Where soldiers will play a part, and this is really the first shooter experience that you and I had in a CoD game, is that we get to control it. We get what I call the wisdom. So, really, as a player in this game, you have the wisdom to control all of these technologies in the level that you think would make it appropriate for this battle, and that’s the role that people have in war and also in life, moving forward, is to use all of these technologies and to figure out how to use them best, and when’s appropriate, and which ones.

These things, to me, are tools the same way a hammer or a screwdriver is: they’re very sophisticated, and they alleviate a lot of the hard grunt work, but they’re always used in the hands of people. Even when we’re talking about remote which, again, you can see in the game, operates at huge distances. We can fire something and it hits 1,000 kilometres away. It’s still people making that decision that that’s what we should do and then using technology to do it, which is that firsthand experience that we have as the shooter or as the player.

Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare Gameplay Demo – IGN Live: E3 2014
11:23
IGN: What type of things are we going to see beyond the technology of Advanced Warfare? Are we going to be seeing lightsabers, laser rifles and space battles in the next iteration of warfare, or is that still way, way off?

Morris: I don’t know about laser battles. We probably will, but there’s lots of stuff on the horizon that we don’t yet know about. We’ve got what are called smart guns. Now, smart guns are guns that know who the shooter is, so it will only work in your hands. You can attach smart bullets, and that will make sure that the bullet doesn’t actually come back to shoot the shooter. So, in other words, if you dropped the gun, nobody else could pick it up and use it… So we’ve got those kinds of technologies. We’ve also got underpinning it, the notion of the PMC, the private military company, and that’s kind of like what the game is built on, this notion that warfare has not been handed over, but is now a private corporation, and that’s something that we’re going to see in warfare. We’re already doing it. I think we’re going to see more and more of it as we move through the decades. What was once a government activity is now also possibly a private activity.

IGN: PMCs seem like such a Hollywood concept.

Morris: Yeah, but they’ve been around for, honestly, 30 or 40 years. They just haven’t been well known, and they’re becoming more and more prominent, as are most things where the government has decided it doesn’t play a part, or shouldn’t play a part anymore. So a government will still engage in war if they think it’s relevant, they’ll still take the battle on, but they will often bring outsourced expertise in, and that’s what you get to play in this game.“
A government will still engage in war if they think it’s relevant, they’ll still take the battle on, but they will often bring outsourced expertise in, and that’s what you get to play in this game.

What you have, I mean, you’re part of this PMC, and what you have is best thinking, best people, best technology, because the argument is the government, with the best of intentions, can’t upgrade their technology very often. They can’t really train their people easily and quickly, they can’t deploy them easily and quickly, whereas a private company, by the nature of it, it makes a profit by making sure that people are well trained, up to date, have the latest technology, are very clear and precise about what their targets are and about what they need to do, and can move quite quickly. That’s why governments like PMCs because they can achieve all those things, where a government is slow and cumbersome.

So in the game, you actually get to be part of the experience of a PMC: somebody who is agile, somebody who has the latest technology. All these things which are part of modern warfare and will be into the future are really just there for us to play with.

IGN: How far ahead into the future can a futurist safely predict things with a decent sense of accuracy?

Morris: The answer is I can’t predict what’s going to happen in the next two minutes. I’m careful about that because all I talk about is hypothesising. I can’t force everyone to have my will, but I can hypothesise the things that are more likely. Now, the furthest that I’m working at the moment is 2060, so some of my projects are really thinking into 2060, around whatever that particular issue is. I’ve done this for 33 years, you can track me back for about 15 years online through my blog and other things, and I’m fairly accurate: I’m up around 90 percent plus. I’m really careful and deliberate about the things that I speak about; I do not make wild accusations or comments. I’m careful and deliberate, but I’m also very much provocative. I don’t just take safe steps. If you talk to most of my clients I talk about outlandish things that they think are incredible, but with the space of time, they can turn out to be quite ordinary. But it’s all about hypothesising, for me, and I know I’m being semantic about the word, but I’m always careful that people understand that I’m not forcing my will on them, I’m just forcing my opinion on them.

They can then use that and, again, that’s what this game has done. It’s used a whole lot of futurists, a whole lot of other people and, together, collectively, looked at what’s ahead. Part of what I think is going to come from this game, which is my science fiction, is everyone that plays it will decide if they like various elements and, without knowing it, they’ll go into the future and create the things they like, because that’s what happened with science fiction. We liked things in the movies we saw and the books we read, in the cartoons we saw, and then, as individuals, we took elements out of it and said, ‘It doesn’t exist. Why doesn’t it? How do I make it exist?’ And we went ahead and created it. It’s just phenomenal. I did a piece about a year ago about the 10 technologies that came out of Star Trek, and they were things that we never thought would happen but have all become real because baby boomers like me saw it and said, ‘You know what? I’m going to make it happen.’ That’s what you get to do with this game, you get to play first-hand, see it, if you love it and think it should be a part of our world, then some of the people that play it will actually be the innovators and inventors of it.

If you plan on inventing something from Advanced Warfare, readers, please push for the personal invisibility cloak so we can add it to our futuristic Predator cosplay.

Workflow: four-day-week fans | The Australian

Masthead-570_0Business futurist Morris Miselowski says the notion of a weekend and a standard five-day week with 9-5 jobs will become obsolete in the next few years as workplaces move into a world that exists on a project and task basis.

Miselowski says getting things done as, where and when they need to be done will be the norm, rather than trying to shoehorn roles into an industrial revolution-constructed work week.

He says the ability to work where and when you want will allow families to choose together time that suits them all, to be able to come together for important events and school activities and to reframe family back into the centre of activity, rather than something that must be juggled in a busy week.

Miselowski supports claims by one of Britain’s leading doctors who recently called for that country to switch to a three-day weekend.

The doctor claimed a four-day week would enhance health, wellbeing, family, society and the economy, and based it on the need for more time to relax and unwind, creating more efficient workers focused on four days of work, with the chance to hire others to work on additional days.

source The Australian August 09, 2014

The “3 Day Weekend” Revolution | Channel 9’s Today Show & Loads of Radio and Newspapers

day offA couple of weeks ago I made an off-handed comment on the changing nature of the workplace and how we must evolve the way we work, not just the work we do so that work becomes appropriate to where and when it is best done.

The nature of our work is changing from an industrial revolution model of 9-5 to a project and task mentality. The need for weekends was religious and that no longer has the same attraction and increasingly the work many of us do is best done where and when it’s appropriate rather than shoehorning it into a 9-5 Monday to Friday framework in a fixed and constant space.

These seem like simple statements, but caused such angst in the media that my phone rang hot with interview requests for radio, television and newspaper and below are just some of them.

This evolution will change what it means to work, where work is done, what family and social time is and when it is done and will impact on retail and leisure industries and many others and is not meant to be THE only way to work in the future, but rather one of the continuum of work-style choices that we can choose from.

Have a watch or listen to some of these segments and then join the revolution and spread the word.

ABC Perth Saturday Breakfast with James Lush (regular segment)


6PR Perth Saturday Nights with Craig Weston

ABC Gippsland with Sian Sian Gard

Morning’s on ABC Darwin – 31st August 2014

Mackenzie Dixon – Sunshine FM Perth

Southern Cross Austereo WA with Wayne Taylor

Mitch Byatt – 2SER

Brig and Lemo – Gold FM

Justin Smith 2UE

Peter Bell 6PR

Phil – ABC Adelaide

Flexibility in the workplace: The three-day working week | RADIO ABC FNQ

r1311858_18059508By Isaac Egan and Phil Staley

On the surface the three-day working week might seem like it only benefits the employee, but business futurist Morris Miselowski says there are broader benefits to the concept than you might think.

Mr Miselowski says there will always be industries in which you need to be there for a set period, but for some industries nine to five is actually an inefficient model.

“We are really beginning to ask ourselves, when is the most appropriate time to be doing this work, where is the most appropriate place to be doing this work,” he said.

“Let’s answer those questions … rather than just trying to shoehorn it into a nine to five.”

Technology and workplace efficiency

Mr Miselowski says technology has enabled us to think differently about working hours.

“We are able to connect with each other really easily, regardless of whether we are physically somewhere or not,” he said.

“All of these things make it possible not to be together as often as possible in one space, but rather to be in many spaces doing work where and when it is required.”

He says it is already happening in many workplaces, but more in the form of general flexibility of hours.

“The top end of town don’t ask their people to come in anymore because they are working on site with their clients again, and they are doing it at times that are relevant to their clients,” he said.

“We have begun to do it on the quiet, so we are already beginning to see flexibility in the workplace.

“There are lots of people out there doing it; I think it is a quiet revolution.”

Why do we do nine to five?

Mr Miselowski says the nine to five model is based on very different times.

“The reason we have nine to five was because we moved off the land into industrial revolution,” he said.

“We all had to turn up at a particular time; many hands made light work so we all worked for a particular period of time.

“That whole paradigm of what we used to have really doesn’t suit us anymore.”

 Family life

Mr Miselowski says if used appropriately and effectively, flexibility of working hours can have a positive effect on family life.

“Currently what we are trying to do is compact family life in to a day or a couple of days per week. But wouldn’t it be great when our kids have something on at school, where before we might not have been able to go, we can now quite easily go, no guilt attached?” he said.

“So I think that the family will be able to actually manufacture time that suits them and their activities and what they like doing rather than trying to squeeze it all into the weekend hours.

“As long as the work is done appropriately, it is done to specification and on time … then I don’t think that it really matters how.”

source

The take time off whenever you need it revolution starts on Channel 9’s Today show this Sunday

channel 9If you’re up on Sunday morning at around 8.10 a.m. switch on Channel 9’s Today program and watch me chat to the guys about whether we will ever see a 3 day weekend – spoiler alert: NO – but I’ve got a much better idea, the “take time off whenever you need it” revolution.

We’re not living in the industrial revolution anymore, but we’re working and living like we are.

Let’s evolve, let’s liberate, let’s work hard, work where and when its appropriate, love life and take time off when we need it.

Anyway, that’s my game plan and I’m going to spell it out live on air this Sunday morning, hope you can make it