It’s not a ghost, it’s just a hologram / ABC Canberra

occulus riftYou’ve got to love a story that starts by assuming that physical meetings are going to end and business travel will soon become redundant., it’s just like the hype and hysteria around Skype, VoIP and other teleconferencing tools a few years ago when everybody was sure the events industry was dead and that airplanes would only be used for leisure travel.

In fact none of this has even remotely come true and instead we have seen an increase in both event attendance and business travel.

holograph imagesPhilip Clark of ABC Canberra and I chatted about the upsurge of use of Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR), the first being the use of holograms and digital worlds like in Star Trek’s holodeck and the latter being a visor you wear within which you experience the digital world.

CAVE2 Immersive Virtual Reality System | Mechdyne at Monash University Clayton

CAVE2 Immersive Virtual Reality System | Mechdyne at Monash University Clayton

These technologies are both coming of age, with VR expected to be a $30 billion industry and AR a $120 billion by 2020.

VR headsets abound and are mostly under $300 and we can expect Microsoft and Oculus Rift amongst others to have headsets next year just in time for a growing catalogue of software and VR experiences.

Have a listen to the segment now (4 minutes 48 seconds).


 

Eye on the Future - Aug 11, 2015 | All, Augmented Reality, Business, events, Horizon Trends, Radio Interview, Technology, Work
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