Preparing our children for an unknown world / Sky News – Derryn Hinch Live

derryn_hinch_30_Aug_2105How does an education system so rooted in past needs and based on remembering and working with known, verifiable and repeatable outcomes cope with a tomorrow world where 60% of the tasks today’s school leavers will do in the workforce and the industries that they will do them in, have yet to be invented.

In this semi regular chat Derryn Hinch of Sky News and I chatted about this new world of work and school where today’s students will live to 120, earn income into their 90’s, have 6 careers and 14 jobs and live in a world where they are paid to undertake tasks rather than employed to do ongoing work.

In this new world travel agents will use augmented and visual reality to send travelers on digital holiday’s. Plumbers will 3D print their needs on site. Service industries will rise in preferred career choice industries as more of us choose to outsource to others what we choose not to do ourselves and health, well-being and longevity experts are lauded and well rewarded.

If we are to prepare our children for the jobs that they will need to create in the future, then we need to rise above the politics and the blaming, above point scoring and blaming of others, stop relying on the romantic and outdated notion of the 3R’s and start embracing the 3C’s – communication, collaboration and creative problem solving and start growing the education landscape of tomorrow.

In this new education landscape teachers are facilitators, students are life long learners and the classroom and its resources are there to foster exploration and provocative learning, allowing each student to engage with the learning in a manner best suited to their individual learning style and needs, engage with people inside and outside of the physical rooms, engage with the digital world, be monitored by technology to gauge engagement and learning and supported by humans where they are not and ultimately held accountable for having learned the lesson by their display of understanding it not merely by their ability to remember and regurgitate it.

There is no certainty in tomorrows’ education and work space and this frightens previous generation’s who, with the best of intentions, want to prepare students and give them every tool for every circumstance to ensure their future success, but shackling them with this impossible attempt at certainty, is only serving as an anchor around their necks.

Today’s students are not preoccupied with certainty, they relish the unknown and we as their guides must teach them the foundations, school them in the ways of the world, open them to a myriad of possibilities and then trust that what we have given them enough to launch them into tomorrow.

Let’s teach them to be audacious and enthuse them to be creative and solve today’s problems, if for no other reason than pure selfishness – our survival.

Watch this segment (9 minutes) and then join the debate on the future of education

What’s over the job and career horizon?

future careerThere’s a lot of conversation going on around the future of careers and jobs, given recent manufacturing and mining redundancy announcements and it has everyone asking what careers and jobs are future proof and which are not.

Firstly many of today’s and yesterdays professions will still be around including – teachers, doctors, health professionals, retailers and many others will still be around in 50 years, but how they do their jobs, where and when they do it and how important it may be, will evolve over time.

The foresight issue is that today’s Grade 1 student will finish high school in 2025 and if they go on to further education, will eventually enter the workforce in the late 2020’s or early 2030’s. What will the world of 2030 look like? What career choices will there be? What will work be and mean to them?

If we already know with certainty that 2030 will be significantly different from today then how how do we get our children safely and competently between here and then? How do we educate them today for a world of tomorrow that we can only guess at, a world in which they’ll live to 120 years of age, work in well into their 80’s, have 6 careers and 14 jobs and work project and task driven, physically and virtually in a mixture of solo activities, in teams and across the globe.

What are the career choices of tomorrow. What and how do we teach our children so that are nimble, flexible and ready for this new evolving world? How do we cope and deal with the industries and jobs that will fall away between now and then and how do we evolve, find, accept and champion the industries and jobs of tomorrow?

This topic ran hot on ABC Radio Local and Australia and here are some of the other interviews I did Around Australia on similar themes and questions so for my views on all these questions and more have a listen now and then share your thoughts on what’s waiting up ahead for our children.

Jill EmbersonJill Emberson – Mornings ABC Newcastle – Monday 13th February


 

Ron TaitRon Tait  Breakfast Program ABC South West -Western Australia – Monday 17th February

Kate O'TooleKate O’Toole – Afternoon Program ABC Darwin – Monday 17th February

Sonya FeldhoffSonya Feldhoff  – Afternoon Program ABC Adelaide – Tuesday 18th February

 

 

 

 

 

 

What future career would you bet on?

career and opp signsWith school starting back around Australia, it’s a perfect time to ask ourselves the perennial question of which careers and future are we preparing our kids for?

As a baby boomer, my world of education asked me at the end of my final year of high school to make one (1) career choice and to get a job a trade or a qualification in it. My employer would promote and reward me for my longevity and at the end of my 40 years retire me, hand me over to the government for a pension and to my family for my final golden years.

Today’s kids have no promise of job tenure, but instead will have six (6) careers and 14 jobs in their lifetime. They will work until their mid 80″s, live to 120 years of age and work in a digitally connected world in careers and jobs that we can not imagine today.

Over the next 40 years industries, professions, careers, job titles, job roles, daily tasks will fall away, rise and be born and work styles, habits, work hours, work places and  work technologies will all evolve to replace the previous normal.

The challenge facing us is how do we educate today’s children for a world none of us can accurately predict and will largely be up to them to innovate and invent. How do we impart and measure life long knowledge and wisdom through an education system that is itself changing daily and in a world where debate is rife around what education is, when it is gained and what it should be.

This was the starting point of this mornings regular chat with David Dowsett of ABC Wide Bay, so have a listen now, read through my earlier article on tomorrow’s career choices and let me know what you think we need to do to get our kids job ready for the world of tomorrow.