1/2 of today’s kinder kids will be unemployable in 2030 / 3AW, 6PR, 2UE, 4BC, ABC Overnights, Austereo, ABC Far Nth Qld

images The Future of Education is such an important topic if we are going to set our kids up to succeed in tomorrow’s world and workplace and I’m glad to see the media agrees. Here are some of the radio interviews I did on the back of this recent media release including an extended piece for ABC local radio’s Overnight program with listener talk back :


“Half of all children starting kindergarten this year have no chance of getting a job in 2030, if we continue to educate them the way we currently are” is one of the findings in a new bold trend report exploring the world of work in 2030 compiled by Australian futurist, Morris Miselowski, one of the world’s leading business and education visionaries.

In 2030, 1 in 4 cars sold will be fully autonomous. Robots, Artificial Intelligence, Drones and Connected Cities will all be as ordinary as gas, electricity and water. Mobile phones, keyboards and mice will be relegated to museums and the notion of 9 – 5 Monday to Friday work will have given way to project and task-work done however, whenever and wherever it’s appropriate.

In 2030 the Australian population will have grown to 28,481,000 (23,972,800 today), against a global population of 8,500,766 (7,349,472 today). 1 in 5 Australian’s will be over 60 years old; the ratio of workers to retirees will 3:1 (5:1 today); the average Australian house will costs $3,000,000 ($658,608 today) and the average household income will be $275,000 ($145,400 today).

In 2030 India will have surpassed China as the most populous country on the earth; America’s global dominance will have waned and the world’s middle class will have risen from 2.1 billion today to 4.9 billion, 66% of whom will be living in Asia.  It will be an era of lower global birth rates and of living longer and healthier lives.

In 2030 there will be too many human workers competing globally for too few jobs, with many of today’s routine jobs having been handed over to technology and in an ironical twist this new technology will be responsible for creating millions of new human jobs, tasks and careers.

This year’s kinder students will live to 120, work into their 90’s, undertake 2 simultaneous income producing activities at any one time in a lifetime of work that includes 6 careers and 14 jobs, undertaking tasks and working in industries that are yet to be discovered and if they are going to succeed in a 2030 world of work” they will need to create their own work, not apply for it”.

In 2030 Australian retention rates for completing Year 12 will be 90% (83.6% today), but there will no written exams to mark the end of schooling, nor a single university score required to gain entry to higher education.

This is the world our kindergarten starters of 2015 will face when they enter the workforce, and it’s this world of vastly changed horizons that we must prepare them for” says Miselowski.

It will demand different of its workforce, as we see new careers rising including transhumanist designers, genome specialists, nano medics, machine linguists, gamification engineers amongst many others as well as the continuation of many of today’s trades and service careers, but what they do, how, where and when they do it will have all evolved – “nothing then, will be as it is now!” says Miselowski.

Today’s education system however, backed by well-intentioned but short-sighted educators and parents, is still underpinned by an archaic industrial revolution model of teaching dominated by the 3R’s (reading, writing and arithmetic – 2 of which don’t even begin with an “R”) that was right for an era where student outcomes, careers paths and choices industry were well-known.

In 2030 the 3R’s won’t work, they conspire to teach rigidity, uniformity, conformity and compliance. What today’s kindergarten students really need from us is to be inspired by the 3C’s of Collaboration, Creativity and Communication so that they can influence, innovate and change their world ahead.


So have a listen to some of these segments and then add your voice to the future of education:

ABC Overnights – Brad McKenzie – 21st January (31 minutes 44 seconds) – includes listener calls

3AW, 2UE, 4BC – Australia Overnight – Alan Pearsall – 23rd January (12 minutes 05 seconds)


6PR – Chris Isley – Monday 26th January (13 minutes 15 seconds)

ABC Townsville – Michael Clarke – 21 January (10 minutes 17 seconds)

Austereo WA – Anthony Tilli – 28 January (5 minutes 4 seconds)

The education system is strangling our kids / 6PR, ABC Wide Bay, ABC Far North

4738992473_38ff2f7971Today’s students will live to 120, have 6 careers and 14 jobs and work into their 90’s in industries that we haven’t even begun to imagine, doing tasks that we don’t yet know we need.

With an education system built on rote learning, the 3 R’s and a set of entrenched structures all developed for a past world of pre digital needs, jobs and outcomes – it’s so last century.

In this century, certainty is uncertain.

We have already seen traditional white and blue-collar jobs taken over by robots and artificial intelligence; as industries of old topple and fledgling new industries emerge.

If our children are to survive in this brave new world, then we must rise above partisan politics, legacy systems and tired curricula and re-imagine what an education system based on the 3C’s – creativity, collaboration and communication might look like and what life, work and jobs of the future may be.

Have a listen now and then share your thoughts on the education system and its ability to prepare our children for the great unknown.

Phil Staley ABC Far North Queensland (18 minutes 51 seconds – 24 August 2015)

David Dowsett – ABC Wide Bay (7 minutes 22 seconds – 24 August 2015)

6PR’s Chris Ilsley (13 minutes 56 seconds – 18th August 2015)

Today’s #education is mostly irrelevant | 4BC

future-classroom-1-500x375Education is in a hurricane of disruption.

The industrial revolution education model that we’ve had for the last 100 years or so doesn’t work anymore and definitely won’t work in the near future.

This is not because we don’t have great teachers, wonderful students, well-intentioned parents and a society that sees the value in education, but because what we learned and had to know in the past is of little value to tomorrow’s children, but yet it continues to frame education moving forward.

Even though we are reticent to admit it we have long ago outsourced our basic remembering to calculators, electronic dictionaries, smart phones and other gadgets, which makes the need for the 3R’s (writing, arithmetic and reading) less necessary than they once were.

Add to this the certainty that our kids will have on average 6 careers and 14 jobs in their 120 years lives / 90 years work span, working in industries that haven’t yet been created, performing tasks and using skills that we can’t imagine today and we have an ever changing world ahead of us, much of which will be innovated and invented by today’s students.

The fundamental question in education now has to be “How do you teach people about stuff that hasn’t yet been thought of?”

In our regular catch up Clare Blake of 4BC and I chatted about some of the moving parts of the education system and what lies ahead for our students, teachers and parents.

We explored a changing classroom where the 3r’s are supplemented with the 3C’s of educationcommunication, collaboration and creative problem solving and a future landscape where human teachers monitor the real-time second by second learning of each student, using technology as electronic teachers aide to present the learning and adapt the teaching style to best suit the individual learner.

In this brave new world of life long learning, of constantly evolving and devolving skills, of careers and jobs rising and falling, in a near future world where data, knowledge and routine work are mostly provided by technology, the role of humans in the workplace and in life is up for debate.

Our ability to be ready for the world ahead has historically been provided to us by our K-12 education, but moving forward  readying our children with absolute certainty for their future will not be possible, so how will we prepare our kids for a world ahead that is so vastly unknown.

Perhaps the only way to do this, is for our education to evolve from a system that teaches us to answer the questions to a system that teaches us to question the answers.

Listen in to this segment now (19 mins) and then let me know your thoughts on the future of the education…

 

 

 

The World of #Jobs

future jobsIn a future world there may not be a retirement age, we may not all be working 9 -5 work, we may not have job descriptions and we will almost certainly not have culturally sanctioned employment certainty.

In this new landscape of employment we will work project and task, work at any age, work wherever is geographically or digitally best, come and go from employers and clients and work to a more fluid lifestyle, where work life balance and today’s social norms are culturally historical and no longer viable.

This world brings one of possibility and adventure, it mimics a pre industrial age, where we lived on the land we farmed or near the work we had, we worked when work needed to be done, where and when it needed to be done, lived with and close to family and within a community. This is not a rose colored view, times were as tough and as wonderful as they are today.

The constant is that there is and has been no perfect solution to employment and work and most probably will never be. The difference ahead is that we are moving into an era of greater choices and flexibility, where unlike the last 150 years we will not need as often many hands to make light work nor we will not need to gather together at a centralised means of production, but rather for many of us our work will be more decentralised and more fractured in its design, tasks, execution and measurement.

It is this world that James Lush of radio ABC Perth and I spoke about in our regular Saturday morning catch up. James’s  questions were thought provoking and made us both reach deeper to find threads of solutions and hints of tomorrow’s thinking.

I’d love you to have a listen to this interview and then share your thoughts on the future world of jobs.

 

What’s over the job and career horizon?

future careerThere’s a lot of conversation going on around the future of careers and jobs, given recent manufacturing and mining redundancy announcements and it has everyone asking what careers and jobs are future proof and which are not.

Firstly many of today’s and yesterdays professions will still be around including – teachers, doctors, health professionals, retailers and many others will still be around in 50 years, but how they do their jobs, where and when they do it and how important it may be, will evolve over time.

The foresight issue is that today’s Grade 1 student will finish high school in 2025 and if they go on to further education, will eventually enter the workforce in the late 2020’s or early 2030’s. What will the world of 2030 look like? What career choices will there be? What will work be and mean to them?

If we already know with certainty that 2030 will be significantly different from today then how how do we get our children safely and competently between here and then? How do we educate them today for a world of tomorrow that we can only guess at, a world in which they’ll live to 120 years of age, work in well into their 80’s, have 6 careers and 14 jobs and work project and task driven, physically and virtually in a mixture of solo activities, in teams and across the globe.

What are the career choices of tomorrow. What and how do we teach our children so that are nimble, flexible and ready for this new evolving world? How do we cope and deal with the industries and jobs that will fall away between now and then and how do we evolve, find, accept and champion the industries and jobs of tomorrow?

This topic ran hot on ABC Radio Local and Australia and here are some of the other interviews I did Around Australia on similar themes and questions so for my views on all these questions and more have a listen now and then share your thoughts on what’s waiting up ahead for our children.

Jill EmbersonJill Emberson – Mornings ABC Newcastle – Monday 13th February

 

Ron TaitRon Tait  Breakfast Program ABC South West -Western Australia – Monday 17th February

Kate O'TooleKate O’Toole – Afternoon Program ABC Darwin – Monday 17th February

Sonya FeldhoffSonya Feldhoff  – Afternoon Program ABC Adelaide – Tuesday 18th February

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unlearn the Future – Morris Live at TEDx Melbourne

To have the TEDx stage for 18 minutes is a privilege and an honor. To use this global platform to tell the story of my family’s past, to introduce my ancestors who have not been spoken of or seen in over 70 years to a worldwide audience that they could never have imagined and to combine all of this with my love of the infinite possibilities of the future and what we must each do to allow these opportunities into our lives is a gift that I will cherish forever – thank you!!

I would love you to watch it, like it and leave a comment to let me know what you see ahead and what excess baggage you’re leaving behind to make room for the future and an enormous thank you to the 1,000+ people that watched it within the first 24 hours of it being put up on YouTube.

Careers and Beyond

future-jobs-jpgEver wanted to know what the best career choices are? Here’s a great article, hot off the presses on future career paths and it even has some choice quotes from your favourite business futurist.

reprinted from Careers FAQ

The A-Z of top jobs for 2014 and beyond
09 Dec 2013
By Marni Williams

Where are the shortages?

According to the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR), employment is set to grow by 820,100 jobs, or 7.1 per cent, to November 2017 across most industries and occupations in Australia. That’s decent growth, but if you want to get a job in 2014 you need to know where the demand will be.

DEEWR says the biggest areas for job growth will be healthcare and assistance (13 per cent), retail trade (8.9 per cent) and construction (10.1 per cent): ‘Together, these three industries are expected to provide nearly half of the total growth in employment over the next five years’.

Business futurist Morris Miselowski suggests we will have six careers within a lifetime, so if you’re thinking about which direction to take next it would pay to consider one of the golden opportunities below – because this is where the jobs will be.
Top jobs in 2014:

Accounting and finance
Aged and disabled care
Business bankers
Community engagement and community development
Construction
Data miners, data scientists, data anything…
Dental technicians
Digital marketing managers
Education
Health technologists and medical device reps
Mobile developers
Online retailers
Programmers
Project managers
Senior leasing executives
Tourism and hospitality
Website content writers
3D printers
Accounting and finance

Jobs for accountants are still going strong and are set to increase by 12.6 per cent to 2017 (DEEWR).

There will be demand in the financial and wealth management areas, specifically for senior financial planners, multilingual financial planners and financial paraplanners.

Global recruiter Hays says: ‘In accountancy and finance we expect to see new jobs created within the area of business and IT transformation … so that an organisation can adapt to growth and make cost savings. It is also important for audit/compliance purposes, particularly if the company plans to become ASX listed or has been acquired by an overseas head office’.
Aged and disabled care

Aged and disabled care has seen growth of over 102 per cent over the last five years and it will only continue to grow exponentially as preventative care, residential care, therapeutic treatments and hospital services will be required by large numbers of ageing baby boomers.

Business bankers

Business banking is a growth area, with new roles created in specialist areas. Credit assessors with a strong mortgage background and a DCA or equivalent will be in high demand as new teams are created in major banks. In addition, candidates with front-end retail experience will be sought as banks change their approach to business banking.
Community engagement and community development

With our cities needing to cope with growing populations, housing shortages and changing demographics, local councils are getting serious about community engagement. So, too, are businesses as they understand the importance of community outreach and really engaging with customers, residents and businesses.
Construction

The ongoing shortage of surveyors continues as students shy away from maths and science. With many bound to retire, it’s not just an area of opportunity, it’s vital to a strengthening construction industry.

Hays highlights a ‘historical’ shortage of estimators encompassing the residential, commercial and civil sectors. They are also seeing demand for civil estimators in response to recent restructures.
Data miners, data scientists, data anything…

Business futurist Miselowski is excited: ‘We have spent the last 30 years feeding information about ourselves and the world into the digital ether, without getting much wisdom back. The next frontier is mining this information and turning it into purposeful knowledge. A new breed of employee is emerging called data scientists, who are tasked with the job of refining data to enable good decisions’.

Hays agrees, saying that employers are increasingly looking for applicants with a Master in Information Systems. This is one job that can translate across many sectors.
Dental technicians

With our ageing population, the fact that most of us retain our own teeth much longer, and an increase in demand for cosmetic dental work, dental technicians will be in high demand alongside a range of health professions. According to the Australian Dental Association, demand for dental prostheses is down, but specialist areas such as crowns and bridges are up.
Digital marketing managers

When I asked her about trending jobs, Director of Hays (NSW & ACT) Jane McNeill put digital marketing high on her list:

‘Digital marketing managers are in demand as growth and investment in digital marketing is creating a “digital disconnect” in which the jobs market in digital marketing technology is hungry for skilled workers. The evolution of digital marketing is set to continue over the next decade and this will have a huge impact on the skills employers need. As this continues to be a growing area candidates with technical knowledge or digital expertise are in high demand.’
Education

We’ve seen impressive numbers turn to online education all over the world, but will there be jobs to follow? Fairfax’s Employment Forecast says that population growth will see the education sector continue to rise, having ‘shrugged off the weakness in the international student sub-sector to record continued jobs growth, with positions up 4.6 per cent’.

A recent government report indicates that the international student sector could grow by 30 per cent by the end of the decade. With continued population growth and the investment in skills and training programs, the outlook for the sector is bright.

It has also noted a surge in pre-school teacher positions and ‘a significant shortage of early childhood teachers’. Positions in the tertiary education sector are also up 3.4 per cent.
Health technologists and medical device reps

You may know that healthcare is experiencing the biggest growth of all sectors, but it’s also changing. With developments in everything from genetics to wearable technologies and robotics, a plethora of new jobs are expected. Miselowski expects new titles such as ‘genetic counsellor’, ‘telemedical practitioner’ and a range of medical device reps to appear.

Anyone who works in the allied health profession but also understands computers and technology will find plenty of opportunities on the horizon. And a range of medical device reps are already needed, as Hay’s Jane McNeil says:

‘In life sciences there are new products coming to market and companies are keen to employ medical device reps with like-for-like experience so that they can hit the ground running. An increasing number of roles now also require clinical backgrounds.’
Mobile developers

Technology recruiter Greythorn is optimistic in its report: ‘With mobile access to the web growing at an exponential rate, and the way in which we interact with the web being driven more and more toward mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets, mobile developers are becoming a highly sought after entity’.

Expertise across Android, iOS and HTML 5, coupled with e-commerce integration skills, social networking and API knowledge will set you up to take advantage of this growth area.
Online retailers

It’s hardly ground-breaking news: according to the Australian and New Zealand Online Shopping Market 2013 report, online retail is growing strongly.

National Australia Bank’s latest online retail sales index tells us that online sales have hit 6.2 per cent of retail spending. What’s more, the average annual spend for Australian online shoppers is expected to hit $1750 by the end of this year and 90 per cent of online shoppers expect to maintain or increase their spending over the next year.
Programmers

For a moment there IT might have looked like it was having a slow patch, but the industry is still growing strongly and more growth is expected with the continued rollout of the NBN. However, programmers are now working on short-term contracts and this is set to continue. As Greythorn says, ‘project-based recruitment will be one of the pillars of growth and activity for our industry’. Java and PHP skills are, and will continue to be, highly valued.
Project managers

It’s a broad field, but DEEWR predicts contract, program and project administrators to increase by a whopping 16.4 per cent to 2017. It might be time to really work on those project management skills.
Senior leasing executives

McNeill cites several large new shopping centre developments and upgrades as a driver of real estate jobs in some regional areas – ‘there is more vacant space to fill with tenants. This has created demand for senior leasing executives in the retail space’.
Tourism and hospitality

According to the Fairfax Employment Forecast, the sector is turning around, with jobs once again growing. Burgeoning areas include medical tourism, ancestry travel and sustainable tourism.
Website content writers

As Google declared ‘content is king’, journalists couldn’t believe their ears. Fairfax agrees: ‘In a surprising turnaround, positions for journalists and other writers continue to grow, thanks to the spurt in online content at the expense of more traditional media’.

The journalism and media category actually grew by 3.1 per cent in 2013, which is above-average growth. With the exponential growth in online content production, those with the skills to write it will find themselves in high demand.
3D printers

Ok, so this one might not exactly be ready for 2014, but it’s not far off and is one of the most exciting developments to come. St Vincent’s Hospital in Melbourne will be trialling 3D printing of human body organs within five years and expect that printing human spare parts could become normal within 10 years.

The CSIRO has even initiated the Australian Additive Manufacturing Network to link research organisations with industry to make the use of 3D printers commercially effective. Get involved in 2014 and you’ll be ready for the next set of top jobs coming our way!

TEDx here I come!!

ted_x_melbourne_pictrures_3_Dec_2013I received the most incredible Christmas gift the other month in the form of an invitation to strut my stuff on the TEDx stage in Melbourne on December 3rd and with only 5 sleeps to go I can’t wait to unwrap my present that I’ve titled – Unlearn the Future and don’t worry I haven’t forgotten you – after all it is better to give than receive – your invitation and discount promo code is at the end of this post.

This is a new piece that’s been kicking around in my head for the last three decades or so and speaks to why we so often have difficulty seeing the opportunities ahead; why we feel such trepidation at evolution and innovation and how we must take the best of what we already have and know and blend it with the best of what we need and want from the future if we are going to live up to the expectations we place on tomorrow.

It is also an extremely personal piece as I weave my story of going back to Poland after a family absence of 70 years, finding the old homestead, walking around familiar but never trodden before streets and share how this life altering event taught me to unlearn the future.

As a lead up to this event I did a podcast with Jen Storey of Anthill yesterday, discussing next week’s TEDx event as well as chatting about 3 very challenging questions:

1. What’s the one big thing that is happening now you believe is shaping the business world?
2. With all the amazing new technology around us, what are your thoughts on the trend towards retro – both genuine retro and new technology made to look like old stuff?
3. What are the three trends every entrepreneur should be aware of?

Have a listen now and then share your answers with the Eye on the Future tribe

Great interview, exciting times and if you’re in Melbourne next week I’d like to give you a $20 discount off the ticket price, simply use the word “speaker” in the promo code box when you click here to buy your ticket to TEDx Melbourne.

The Future of Education, Technology, People & Innovation

In our regular look ahead James Lush of ABC Perth and I looked at what’s over the horizon for:

Education
– students will have 6 distinct careers, 14 jobs and live 100+ years; 60% of the job tasks they will do in the next 10 years have not been created yet; the traditional 3r’s – reading, writing, arithmetic- are great foundations, but our kids also need the 3 C’s – communication, collaboration and creative problem solving.

Technology – we have only just begun our technological journey and haven’t seen anything yet; and the imminent rise of the Internet of Things.

People – what will living to 120 mean?; will man and machine meld to the point where it is hard to recognise where flesh ends and machine starts?

Innovation – how Collaborative, Crowdsourcing and Co-create is changing the way we work play and live and why innovation is now a constant in our everyday world.

This is a great interview touching on lot’s of tomorrow’s horizon questions so have a listen now and let me know what you think tomorrow’s big questions are.

Welcome to the Gold Coast

What does education need to provide to meet tomorrow’s societal and business needs, was to have been the topic of the morning between Nicole Dyer of 91.7 ABC Coast FM and myself , but as always we got diverted and this time into a discussion on the Future of Funerals and Cemeteries after a keynote I gave on the Gold Coast over the weekend.

This led us to chat about our changing cultural views around death and memorialisation, not morbid I promise and how technology is being used to remember the dead, pay honour to them and unite a physical and digital family in their time of need.

We did eventually get on to education and aged care and the changes ahead for both.

All in all a great segment. Lot’s of food for thought and I look forward to catching up with Nicole at 9.30 a.m. on the first Monday of each month to chat about what’s happening in the FUTURE.

Listen to the segment now: