10 ways the world will have changed by 2031 / live on Hong Kong 3, ABC WA, ABC FNQ

Gen A’s (born 2002 – 2025) beginning Prep this week, will finish high school in 2031 and emerge into a world that will be so different to today’s that they might as well be living on Mars (and they might be).

In this weeks on air segments I chatted about 10 significant ways the world will have changed by 2031, and what we can do now to get them, ourselves and our businesses ready for the very near world ahead:

  1. Gen A won’t use technology, they will BE technology – tech will be so ordinary, ubiquitous and built into every surface and object that we will speak to it, play with it, and engage with it as if it were another human being and just like today where we pay no attention to the miracles of electricity and gas, tech will be the same just there with us more interested in what it can it do for us, then what it is.
  2. Gen A’s mission will be to create seamless lives – moving between one activity, action, adventure, purchaser or activity will soon be barrier free. Discovery,  Selection, Purchase / Engagement / Use and interaction all occur effortlessly across a myriad of spaces and places as all barriers, hurdles and hiccups seemingly melt away.
  3. Gen A’s will hold employers to ransom as they negotiate for their worth – working 9-5 will have all but disappeared, instead task oriented activities will abound, each paying / costing different amounts, each contributing to a person’s overall income, each requiring negotiation, agreement and sequencing, much of it done by AI.
  4. Gen A’s won’t buy, they’ll shop – routine purchases will be exactly that, routine, completed in the background without any human interaction, but the thrill of the chase, the finding of the unusual and the sport of human shopping will not disappear, so for all things unusual or just for a fun few hours with friends, we’ll still head off to visit our favourite bricks and mortar shop or mall.
  5. Gen A won’t pay for things, they will pay for what things dothe days of owning things as the only way of getting to use them will have long gone, instead we will pay for the end experience through digital contracts that monitor our usage and charge accordingly
  6. Gen A’s won’t own homes, but will have ready access to multiple houses– long-term house leases, new breeds of timeshare and crowd-shared short-term accommodation will be the norm as we grapple to find enough space to cram in our growing population.
  7. Gen A’s won’t own cars, but will be extremely mobile – car ownership is set to fall over the next decade and even the lure of driverless cars won’t be enough to entice many to own a car, instead we will apply a mobility approach, where transport ,appropriate to our immediate needs, self assembles, delivering cars to our doorstep, bikes to our paths, buses to our journey and walking routes for the last metres, all seamlessly orchestrated for us by our technology and the intimate unique knowledge of where we need to be and when and how we prefer to do it.
  8. Gen A’s won’t die of diseases of the body, but rather of the mind – many of today’s incurable diseases of the body will be tamed or better managed over the next few decades, allowing our body to live on to 100 and beyond, but the lesser researched and explored medical areas effecting the brain – dementia, Parkinson’s and others – will become more prevalent and it will take more research, effort and time to understand and manage these.
  9. Gen A’s will live to see the 22nd century – wonder what they’ll see and do and how antiquated what we do today will seem in 2118.
  10. Gen A’s will, by proportion, be the smallest cohort generation we have ever seen – world birth rates will begin to decline over the next decades and Gen A will be the first cohort whose parents don’t need to or want to have multiple children to ensure survival of the family, by the end of the 21st century it is believed that 80% of the world population will be considered “middle class’ and have readier access to work, food, water, sanitation and ongoing education.

It’s a fascinating world ahead and Gen A will need to create it much of it, as they re-imagine what living, being, having, owning, loving and thinking is in the latter 2/3 of the 21st century.

Take a listen now to and then I’d love to hear about your dreams, foresight’s and fears of 2031 and beyond.

ABC Far North Qld – 22nd January 2018 (7 mins 46 secs)


Hong Kong Radio 3 – 16th January 2018 (15 mins 50 secs)

ABC WA Drive – 15th January 2018 (6 mins 50 secs)

Today’s school starters are unemployable in 2032 / ABC Far North, Hong Kong Radio 3

“Half of all children starting kindergarten this year have no chance of getting a job in 2032, if we continue to educate them the way we currently are” is one of the findings in a new bold trend report exploring the world of work in 2030 compiled by Australian futurist, Morris Miselowski, one of the world’s leading business and education visionaries.

In 2030, 1 in 4 cars sold will be fully autonomous. Robots, Artificial Intelligence, Drones and Connected Cities will all be as ordinary as gas, electricity and water. Mobile phones, keyboards and mice will be relegated to museums and the notion of 9 – 5 Monday to Friday work will have given way to project and task work done however, whenever and wherever it’s appropriate.

In 2030 the Australian population will have grown to 28,481,000 (23,972,800 today), against a global population of 8,500,766 (7,349,472 today). 1 in 5 Australian’s will be over 60 years old; the ratio of workers to retirees will 3:1 (5:1 today); the average Australian house will costs $3,000,000 ($658,608 today) and the average household income will be $275,000 ($145,400 today).

In 2030 India will have surpassed China as the most populous country on the earth; America’s global dominance will have waned and the world’s middle class will have risen from 2.1 billion today to 4.9 billion, 66% of whom will be living in Asia.  It will be an era of lower global birth rates and of living longer and healthier lives.

In 2030 there will be too many human workers competing globally for too few jobs, with many of today’s routine jobs having been handed over to technology and in an ironical twist this new technology will be responsible for creating millions of new human jobs, tasks and careers.

This year’s kinder students will live to 120, work into their 90’s, undertake 2 simultaneous income producing activities at any one time in a lifetime of work that includes 6 careers and 14 jobs,

undertaking tasks and working in industries that are yet to be discovered and if they are going to succeed in a 2030 world of work” they will need to create their own work, not apply for it”.

In 2030 Australian retention rates for completing Year 12 will be 90% (83.6% today), but there will no written exams to mark the end of schooling, nor a single university score required to gain entry to higher education.

“This is the world our kindergarten starters of 2015 will face when they enter the workforce, and it’s this world of vastly changed horizons that we must prepare them for” says Miselowski.

It will demand different of its workforce, as we see new careers rising including transhumanist designers, genome specialists, nano medics, machine linguists, gamification engineers amongst many others as well as the continuation of many of today’s trades and service careers, but what they do, how, where and when they do it will have all evolved – “nothing then, will be as it is now!” says Miselowski.

Today’s education system however, backed by well-intentioned but short sighted educators and parents, is still underpinned by an archaic industrial revolution model of teaching dominated by the 3R’s (reading, writing and arithmetic – 2 of which don’t even begin with an “R”) that was right for an era where student outcomes, careers paths and choices industry were well known.

In 2032 the 3R’s won’t work, they conspire to teach rigidity, uniformity, conformity and compliance. What today’s kindergarten students really need from us is to be inspired by the 3C’s of Collaboration, Creativity and Communication so that they can influence, innovate and change their world ahead.

Have a listen to this weeks on air chats with ABC radio Far North’s Kier Shorey and Hong Kong Radio 3’s Phil Whelan and then share your thoughts on our children’s education

ABC Far North, Kier Shorey, Monday 1st February (12 mins 47 secs)

Hong Kong Radio 3, Phil Whelan, Wednesday 2nd February (17 mins 01 secs)

1/2 of today’s kinder kids will be unemployable in 2030 / 3AW, 6PR, 2UE, 4BC, ABC Overnights, Austereo, ABC Far Nth Qld

images The Future of Education is such an important topic if we are going to set our kids up to succeed in tomorrow’s world and workplace and I’m glad to see the media agrees. Here are some of the radio interviews I did on the back of this recent media release including an extended piece for ABC local radio’s Overnight program with listener talk back :


“Half of all children starting kindergarten this year have no chance of getting a job in 2030, if we continue to educate them the way we currently are” is one of the findings in a new bold trend report exploring the world of work in 2030 compiled by Australian futurist, Morris Miselowski, one of the world’s leading business and education visionaries.

In 2030, 1 in 4 cars sold will be fully autonomous. Robots, Artificial Intelligence, Drones and Connected Cities will all be as ordinary as gas, electricity and water. Mobile phones, keyboards and mice will be relegated to museums and the notion of 9 – 5 Monday to Friday work will have given way to project and task-work done however, whenever and wherever it’s appropriate.

In 2030 the Australian population will have grown to 28,481,000 (23,972,800 today), against a global population of 8,500,766 (7,349,472 today). 1 in 5 Australian’s will be over 60 years old; the ratio of workers to retirees will 3:1 (5:1 today); the average Australian house will costs $3,000,000 ($658,608 today) and the average household income will be $275,000 ($145,400 today).

In 2030 India will have surpassed China as the most populous country on the earth; America’s global dominance will have waned and the world’s middle class will have risen from 2.1 billion today to 4.9 billion, 66% of whom will be living in Asia.  It will be an era of lower global birth rates and of living longer and healthier lives.

In 2030 there will be too many human workers competing globally for too few jobs, with many of today’s routine jobs having been handed over to technology and in an ironical twist this new technology will be responsible for creating millions of new human jobs, tasks and careers.

This year’s kinder students will live to 120, work into their 90’s, undertake 2 simultaneous income producing activities at any one time in a lifetime of work that includes 6 careers and 14 jobs, undertaking tasks and working in industries that are yet to be discovered and if they are going to succeed in a 2030 world of work” they will need to create their own work, not apply for it”.

In 2030 Australian retention rates for completing Year 12 will be 90% (83.6% today), but there will no written exams to mark the end of schooling, nor a single university score required to gain entry to higher education.

This is the world our kindergarten starters of 2015 will face when they enter the workforce, and it’s this world of vastly changed horizons that we must prepare them for” says Miselowski.

It will demand different of its workforce, as we see new careers rising including transhumanist designers, genome specialists, nano medics, machine linguists, gamification engineers amongst many others as well as the continuation of many of today’s trades and service careers, but what they do, how, where and when they do it will have all evolved – “nothing then, will be as it is now!” says Miselowski.

Today’s education system however, backed by well-intentioned but short-sighted educators and parents, is still underpinned by an archaic industrial revolution model of teaching dominated by the 3R’s (reading, writing and arithmetic – 2 of which don’t even begin with an “R”) that was right for an era where student outcomes, careers paths and choices industry were well-known.

In 2030 the 3R’s won’t work, they conspire to teach rigidity, uniformity, conformity and compliance. What today’s kindergarten students really need from us is to be inspired by the 3C’s of Collaboration, Creativity and Communication so that they can influence, innovate and change their world ahead.


So have a listen to some of these segments and then add your voice to the future of education:

ABC Overnights – Brad McKenzie – 21st January (31 minutes 44 seconds) – includes listener calls

3AW, 2UE, 4BC – Australia Overnight – Alan Pearsall – 23rd January (12 minutes 05 seconds)

6PR – Chris Isley – Monday 26th January (13 minutes 15 seconds)

ABC Townsville – Michael Clarke – 21 January (10 minutes 17 seconds)

Austereo WA – Anthony Tilli – 28 January (5 minutes 4 seconds)

A glimpse at the way we will live, work and educate in 2030 / Peter Switzer Sky News TV, ABC Far North

switzer Every year, as our newest school kids start kindergarten, I like to take an expectant look forward to the year that many of them may enter the workforce, so welcome to 2030 when:

Australia

  • Australian population will have grown to 28,481,000 (23,972,800 today)
  • 1 in 5 Australian’s will be over 60 years old
  • the ratio of workers to retirees will be 3:1 (5:1 today)
  • the average Australian house will cost $3,000,000 ($658,608 today)
  • the average household income will be $275,000 ($145,400 today).

Global

  • global population will be 8,500,766 (7,349,472 today)
  • India will have surpassed China as the most populous country on the earth
  • America’s global dominance will have waned
  • the world’s middle class will have risen from  4.9 billion (2.1 billion today)
  • 66% of the new middle class will be living in Asia
  • lower global birth rates
  • life expectancy increases
  • healthier lives

 

Education index

  • Australian retention rates for completing Year 12 will be 90% (83.6% today)
  • There will no written exams to mark the end of schooling, nor a single university score required to gain entry to higher education
  • Learning institutions will be hubs, bringing together students, educators, industry and others to provide learning opportunities
  • There will be an increased emphasis on global qualifications
  • Universities and higher education will be vastly different, offering bespoke one-off qualifications and a mixture of modalities and physical and virtual opportunities to study
  • Nano-degrees will exist to teach, assess and accredit specific one-off skills learnt in real-time as, where and when needed will be the norm
  • Students work, understanding and proficiency will be monitored and assisted in real-time by LMS (Learning Management Systems) that will 24/7 assist human classroom teachers, providing unique instructions, examples and assessment for each student

Technology

  • 1 in 4 cars sold will be fully autonomous
  • Robots, Artificial Intelligence, Drones and Connected Cities will all be as ordinary as gas, electricity and water.
  • Mobile phones, keyboards and mice will be relegated to museums

Employment

  • there will be too many human workers competing globally for too few jobs
  • 9 – 5 Monday to Friday work will have given way to project and task-work done however, whenever and wherever it’s appropriate
  • many of today’s routine jobs will have been handed over to technology
  • in an ironical twist this new technology will be responsible for creating millions of new human jobs, tasks, careers and industries.

Life

  • This year’s kinder students will live to 120
  • work into their 90’s
  • undertake 2 simultaneous income producing activities, or more, at any one time
  • have 6 careers and 14 jobs
  • complete tasks and work in industries that are yet to be discovered
  • will need to create their own work, not apply for it

These were just some of the insights that James Daggar-Nickson host of Peter Switzer’s Sky Business TV and I chatted about, as well as the economic, political and human ramifications of this new world that is only 15 years away and Phil Staley of ABC Radio’s Far North Queensland and I picked up in our next regular on-air catch up.

Watch this TV segment (recorded 25th January 2016) and / or listen to the radio interview below (recorded 1st February 2016) and then add your thoughts to what we may see in 2030.

Listen to the interview with Phil Staley ABC Radio Far North – 1st February 2016 (19 minutes 22 seconds)

An on stage conversation about #Education2030, with the Hon. James Merlino MP / Sholem Aleichem Business Breakfast

2015-09-08 07.55.17I was privileged to be asked back again this year to Sholem Aleichem Primary School’s Business Breakfast, this time to chat on stage with Victoria’s Minister for Education James Merlino about the Future of Education.

My ambition was to take him to 2030, the year in which his youngest child would finish school, and talk about the world of then and how we might educate towards it.

It’s always a tough gig trying to get a politician off their high political horse and “yes minister” responses and from the outset I must say I don’t know if I achieved it.

My first question was framed around a world of trying to educate today’s kids for a world of uncertainty, where in 2030 60% of the tasks that they will be doing are today unknown, in industries that haven’t yet been created, with a projection of 500,000 of today’s routine blue and white-collar jobs having disappeared.

His answer was encouraging, but not revolutionary.

He spoke, as do many, of better resourcing classrooms and teachers, of new technologies, of doing more and of having a curriculum that embraces the 3 C’s of communication, collaboration and creativity, but he did not speak of revolution.

We then took up the discussion of what role parents, industry and others should have in future education and the response was again one of acknowledgment that we need to form deeper relationships with each, in order to progress education, but it did not speak to the notion of it takes a village to educate tomorrow’s child.

This is not a criticism of the Minister. It is obvious he is passionate and is trying. It is a criticism of what we have done to our politicians.

The short natured approach that we have forced on them, our growing communal desire to solve complex problems with simple solutions and the need to have it all wrapped in one short succinct irrefutable statement has taken us down a road of short-term glib strategies that mask rather than resolve issues.

Education, like most other big issues, does not have a short-term solution, it is complex, long and forever changing.

Why don’t we value long-term anymore? Why don’t we allow our politicians and our decision makers to take exponential leaps? Why can’t we have another audacious Snowy Mountain type scheme that catapults us into the Future of Education?

Instead we prefer to sling motherhood statements at each other, of children being our future, education being tomorrow’s most important natural resource and innovation being central to Australia’s becoming the smart country.

I do rally hard against we adults scoring points to the detriment of today’s children.

They don’t vote. Their voices are not particularly loud and older generations have a tendency to pillory them for not knowing enough or being too obsessed with the fad of the day and believing that we know what is best for them – but these statements have been made of every older generation about the previous.

The big difference is that today’s generation needs us to make significant changes to our education system if they have any hope of making it in tomorrow’s world.

Our current education system is built on teaching known facts towards known outcomes and measuring our ability to understand them by a pass and fail test, but yet today we preach the need for creativity, state the world of tomorrow is based on uncertainty and speak of failure as a positive thing – these two worlds are incongruous and therefore so is much of our education system.

This is not a go at teachers, or politicians, but rather a go at we who hold too firmly to our old ideals.

We claim to wish the best for our children, but in reality we are smothering them with motherhood statements and outdated systems, curricula and pedagogues and drowning them in our fears of uncertainty and inadequacies.

We cannot and will not give our children what we claim to want to give them, if we continue to do what we’re doing now and merely tinker around the edges.

When parents are asked whether they would be willing to sacrifice themselves for their children’s invariably the majority answer yes, so let’s start sacrificing

Let’s be brave and demand of ourselves and our politicians a long-term commitment to education, where the short-term needs of today’s adults to keep their jobs doesn’t prejudice the brave and uncomfortable decisions we have to make if we are going to educate our children and give them the tools and abilities to create their world in 2030 and beyond.

So listen in to our on stage chat (14 minutes 52 seconds) about Education 2030 and then join us on the road to an Education revolution.

@JamesMerlinoMP; @MrFuture; #futureeducation; #education2030;

Today’s #education is mostly irrelevant | 4BC

future-classroom-1-500x375Education is in a hurricane of disruption.

The industrial revolution education model that we’ve had for the last 100 years or so doesn’t work anymore and definitely won’t work in the near future.

This is not because we don’t have great teachers, wonderful students, well-intentioned parents and a society that sees the value in education, but because what we learned and had to know in the past is of little value to tomorrow’s children, but yet it continues to frame education moving forward.

Even though we are reticent to admit it we have long ago outsourced our basic remembering to calculators, electronic dictionaries, smart phones and other gadgets, which makes the need for the 3R’s (writing, arithmetic and reading) less necessary than they once were.

Add to this the certainty that our kids will have on average 6 careers and 14 jobs in their 120 years lives / 90 years work span, working in industries that haven’t yet been created, performing tasks and using skills that we can’t imagine today and we have an ever changing world ahead of us, much of which will be innovated and invented by today’s students.

The fundamental question in education now has to be “How do you teach people about stuff that hasn’t yet been thought of?”

In our regular catch up Clare Blake of 4BC and I chatted about some of the moving parts of the education system and what lies ahead for our students, teachers and parents.

We explored a changing classroom where the 3r’s are supplemented with the 3C’s of educationcommunication, collaboration and creative problem solving and a future landscape where human teachers monitor the real-time second by second learning of each student, using technology as electronic teachers aide to present the learning and adapt the teaching style to best suit the individual learner.

In this brave new world of life long learning, of constantly evolving and devolving skills, of careers and jobs rising and falling, in a near future world where data, knowledge and routine work are mostly provided by technology, the role of humans in the workplace and in life is up for debate.

Our ability to be ready for the world ahead has historically been provided to us by our K-12 education, but moving forward  readying our children with absolute certainty for their future will not be possible, so how will we prepare our kids for a world ahead that is so vastly unknown.

Perhaps the only way to do this, is for our education to evolve from a system that teaches us to answer the questions to a system that teaches us to question the answers.

Listen in to this segment now (19 mins) and then let me know your thoughts on the future of the education…

 

 

 

“What do you want to be when you grow up?” is such a dumb question | Channel 9’s Today Show Segment

grow upWith today’s students looking at a lifespan of 150 years, a work-span of 80 years and the reality of at least 6 careers and 14 jobs in this time, asking a child today what they want to be when they grow up is useless.

Today’s kids will be and do so many things and many of those “things” have not yet even been dreamed of.

So how do we prepare and educate our kids today, for tomorrow’s challenges?

This was the topic for my segment on Channel 9’s Weekend Today show yesterday, as we pondered #Education2050 .channel 9

We chatted about the Classroom of 2050, the reality of it being large, physical, digital, centralised and decentralised depending on topic and lesson, having a mulch-disciplinary approach to education, having multiple teachers and being  loaded with ubiquitous technology monitoring and supporting the teacher and the student and how Robots would not be dominant players in tomorrow’s education scene and how teachers will always be central and imperative.

Given all of this future physical resourcing, how do we prepare our kids mentally for the challenges ahead and my take is the  only way to do is to unshackle them from the need to always be right, the need to always get it right and quarantine them from absolute certainty and rigidity.

The future will abound with increasing uncertainty and the question of “Why not” will rise as we discover that we can innovate, can change and can evolve at rates previously not thought possible, but we can’t create and live in these new worlds with old world attitudes and learning.

We have to place less emphasis on the 3R”s (writing, arithmetic and reading) that served an industrial revolution education system so well and instead understand that our kids have to be capable of creating their jobs not just getting them and the only way to give them these skills is to imbue them with the 3C’s – Communication , Collaboration and Creative problem solving skills, which will serve them as  a foundation from which to innovate, to engage with the world in all of its forms and places, to listen to the world and have the world listen to them and understand that the answers to today’s questions may not be in what they already know, but rather in what they may yet discover.

Watch the segment now and then let me know your thoughts on Education 2050.

#Education Future Here We Come | ABC Radio Nightlife

abc_Tony_and_Me_25_June_14Wow, what a response – it’s heartening that last nights look into the Future of Education on ABC Local Radio Nightlife Program with Tony Delroy’, around what education must evolve into, who provides it, when, where and how were the building blocks for a stimulating and far reaching discussion on what learning and education must become.

My take on this over the past few decades is that the education system many Baby Boomers and legislators romantically think of as best practice is based on an Industrial Revolution – Just In Case learning model.

This system and delivery method suited the times and purpose of a society where jobs were relatively plentiful, future vocational skill easy to predict and long lived, where change was generational and educations imperative was for us all to be stand alone self sufficient individuals, because there was no easy real time way to know and discover what we didn’t know.

In tomorrow’s landscape our education is moving to a Just In Time approach, with  ubiquitous technology allowing us to discover on as as needs basis, which is imperative moving forward because the skill sets and knowledge our children will need in their future professions and vocations are less obvious as the work landscape of tomorrow sees them working project and task, not 9 -5, working digitally and physically, locally, regionally and globally doing tasks in industries that we can’t name or comprehend today (just think back to the last 10 years and ponder the range of jobs, tasks and industries that have evolved around social media).

Our current education system doesn’t readily cater for this paradigm shift, it is bloated, anachronistic and better suited to a previous age and need.

The 3R’s writing, arithmetic and reading -(and notice that only one starts with an “r”)once served us well as the foundations of a great education system, but today and tomorrow we have to add to these the 3C’s – Collaboration, Communication and Creative Problem Solving because these are the skills sets that will allow our students to find their way in tomorrows workspace, to work and engage with others and to find tomorrow’s solutions to problems that have not yet been identified.

Let’s rise above the competing and erroneous excuses not to innovate and as a society demand exponential change to our Education system and understand that if it is not revolutionised, we are jeapordising our children’s long term future and in turn Australia’s future economy and well being.

Our classrooms of tomorrow must be dynamic, flexible and offer on-going real time student diagnostics and feedback.

They must readily flex to accommodate all learning styles and ensure each child regardless of their perceived abilities maximises their potential.

It must be a space in which teacherpreneurs ply their craft, encouraged by a system and technologies that allows them to instruct, engage and enthuse their students.

If we are going to build Australia as a wisdom nation and turn knowledge into our major export commodity, then we have to start today by educating tomorrow’s workforce, leaders and innovators into how to thrive in a transparent world of change, where today’s certainty is tomorrow’s fallacy and where life long learning is the blissful norm.

Wonderfully the audience was up for the challenge as the switchboard lit up with suggestions and comments on how we might best achieve these audacious aims. So have a listen now, let me know your thoughts on the Future of Education and help spread the word about Australia’s education revolution.

Let’s put Education front and centre

3011000-poster-future-of-educationI’ve been banging on about the future of education for over two decades and every day it seems to get more and more imperative that we own up to the fact that as a society we do not truly value Education and the importance it has in ensuring that Australia continues to enjoy the life and lifestyle we have created for ourselves and want our kids to have and improve on.

The conversation is not one of Politics, Teachers, Unions or opposing sides. It is simple and fundamental. We have built our kids a brand new world, so vastly different form the one we had and were educated to inhabit and protect. It is world where one career and one job per lifetime become 6 careers and 14 jobs. Where working in one fixed space, morphs into working physically and digitally in a myriad of spaces and where 60% of the tasks we will be doing in 2024, have not yet been invented in industries that have not yet evolved.

Educating our children into a world where they create jobs not get jobs is tomorrow’s reality and we must do everything we can to teach them what we do not yet know.

This was the theme for this weeks regular look into the future with David Dowsett of ABC Wide Bay as we explored education and learning and some of the new education related phenomenons including MOOC’s – Massive Open Online courses, Nano degrees, corporates sponsored education and on line tutoring.

Have a listen now and if you’d like to continue the conversation let me know your thoughts or join me this Wednesday 25th June at 10.00 p.m. on Radio ABC Local Nightline with Tony Delroy as we debate the Future of Education, take listeners calls and see if we can get the conversation out of the quagmire of politics and into communal necessity.

All things Future…

Sheridan StewartAll things future was the brief for my chat with Sheridan Stewart of New England ABC local radio and that’s pretty much where we took it, everywhere.

We chatted about the future of communication and journalists and dealt with the perennial question of would we need them moving forward. My answer, as always, is that we must get out of the habit of being adamant that the only way something can be done is how we are doing it now and instead look at what are the core and often innate needs and wants that this activity satisfies. Communication is a fundamental human need and  trait and if anything we are doing more of it now rather than less. What has changed is what we communicate on, what we communicate through, who can communicate and to whom and when we do it and for this we will need to re-skill and rethink how we do it, but the core skills of being a great communicator will still be necessary and in demand well into the future.

Our chat moved on to look at the overwhelming data that’s available on line and the senses of helplessness this may cause by trying to make sense of it all. This anxiety is a real one and is caused in part by our growing awareness of how much we don’t know as compared to how much appears to be available online and how easy it appears to be to find out the answer to the most inane question we would never have though to ask.

To me this is a kid in a candy store phenomenon when you’re overwhelmed by choices and just as you think you’ve made the best or yummiest decision, you spy another sweet and begin to have remorse at your first choice and concern about what you you will choose. The solution lies in our human ability to filter, to make informed sensible decision using the best information we have to hand at the moment and knowing that we can, in most circumstances, pick again another day when we know more or know different.

It also requires us to know that most of what’s available online (80% of which had only been put there in the last 2 years) is really just zeros and ones, that is data. This data in order to be useful needs to be converted into meaningful personalised solutions – knowledge and for this knowledge to be purposeful ongoing it has to become wisdom – wisdom is what we most of are yearning for and for anyone to truly succeeds in the future long-term they will have to sell wisdom – specialist purposeful appreciant insights – these items will become the must-haves we all will be willing to pay for in the future.

With the world currently living through the advent and ramifications of a third industrial revolution and changes everywhere the question of future careers and jobs is an important one and Sheridan and I explored some of the future careers and opportunities our kids may have and the reality that today’s children will be living and working in  a profoundly different world to the one that their parent built and lived in.

A great discussion, lots talked about and many topics issued and raised. I’d love you to listen to this unedited version of our interview and then share your future visions with me.